Prevention

A collection of resources about pediatric obesity assessment, prevention, and treatment-intervention.   Grantees, please send add-resource requests to Denise for approval.  Please include the name of your organization, the resource title, web link,  and category (choose one:  Assessment, Prevention, Treatment-Intervention).


Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium 
Series

Organization:

Department of Nutrition, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Web Address:

http://nutrition.utk.edu/promoting-healthy-weight-colloquium/

The Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium is divided into two series, which are intended for practitioners, family members, and researchers,  The current 2.0 series, begun in 2014 and planned through 2018, focuses on the assessment, treatment, and prevention of maternal and pediatric obesity.  The Spring 2014 Colloquium included presentations from national speakers on pediatric and maternal obesity, and the MCH Life Course.  Speaker presentations were complemented by a panel of practitioners.  Each colloquium is archived and can be viewed via webcast.  Watch the Archived Webcasts from the Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium 2.0 series by clicking HERE.

The prior 1.0 series, offered from 2009-2013, focused on how nutrition, physical activity, and parenting play a role in promoting healthy weight gain in infants and healthy weight in children, adolescents, and adults.  The 1.0 series emphasized the Bright Futures developmental stages and the MCH Life Course Framework.  Topics covered in this series included:

  • Pediatric and maternal obesity and the MCH life course
  • MCH Life Course Framework
  • Bright Futures Developmental Stages of
    • Adolescents and Pregnancy
    • Middle Childhood
    • Early Childhood
    • Infancy
  • Overview of Bright Futures and Maternal and Child Health

For information about the Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium series, click HERE to visit our website.

Spring 2014 Promoting Healthy Weight 2.0:  Pediatric and Maternal Obesity, and the MCH Life Course

The Spring 2014 Promoting Healthy Weight 2.0 Colloquium focused on pediatric and maternal obesity, and the MCH life course.  National presentations were followed by a panel of practitioners and community members, addressing these issues from their perspectives and experiences.  Visit the Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium website for more information about this colloquium and the series overall and to view prior colloquia!

Presentation Titles and Speakers, Spring 2014

A Systems Approach to Childhood Obesity
Terry Huang, PhD, MPH, CPH
College of Public Health
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, Nebraska

Maternal Obesity and Gestational Weight Gain
Anna Maria Siega-Riz, PhD, RD
Gillings School of Global Public Health
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC

Using a Life Course Framework to Promote Healthy Weight
Donna Johnson, PhD, RD
Center for Public Health
University of Washington
Seattle, WA

Panel Discussion
Perspectives of Practitioners and Community Members

Childhood Obesity – Introducing We Can! to MCH & CSHCN Clinic St. Thomas USVI

(Trainee poster presented at the LEADD Trainee Poster Session in the USVI in December 2009)

Organization:

Leadership Education in Developmental Disabilities (LEADD) Certificate Program Westchester Institute for Human Development University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities and New York Medical College in Collaboration with Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities.

Description:

This Distance Learning Trainee Project focused on introducing We Can!, a nationally recognized program and its resources to the MCH (Maternal and Child Health) & CSHCN (Children with Special Health Care Needs) clinics of St. Thomas US Virgin Islands (USVI). We Can! is a public education program designed for families and communities to help children maintain a healthy weight from a family centered approach through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). We Can! targets three important behaviors to help children 8-13 maintain a healthy weight: improved food choices, increased physical activity, and reduced screen time. The US Virgin Island’s (USVI) Department of Health’s MCH & CSHCN clinic is now registered as a the first We Can! general community site in USVI.

Poster PDF: Childhood Obesity – Introducing We Can! to MCH & CSHCN Clinic St. Thomas USVI

Girls Rule! Overview

Girls Rule teaches girls ages 6 through 9 and the women who care for them how to use dietary choices, physical activity, and a positive self image to maintain a healthy weight. The program was developed by the center for Health Promotion Disease Prevention at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in response to national concerns over a growing obesity risk in black females and the lack of programs for obesity prevention in this age group. This is a powerpoint presentation.

PPT: Girls Rule Overview_Ammerman.ppt

After School Programs: Exemplary Practices in Nutrition, Physical Activity & Food Security

If you’ve been looking for great ideas for afterschool programs, visit www.ccscenter.org to download a copy of the new publication, below. It was developed in response to California’s Proposition 49 which, once a budget threshhold was passed, would put over $500M into afterschool programs that provide educational enrichment. The “trigger” was pulled last year, so now school districts and county offices of education are delivering services themselves or contracting w/ other entities. This document is intended to help them! We’d love your feedback!

New Nutrition Education and Physical Activity Exemplary Practices Guide for Afterschool Programs

We would like to share with you the publication by the Center for Collaborative Solutions (CCS) of its new guide for afterschool programs: Developing Exemplary Practices in Nutrition and Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs. This guide, funded by the Network for a Healthy California (USDA Food Stamp Nutrition Education) and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, is designed to help afterschool program leaders and their partners join in the fight against the obesity epidemic facing our children and youth today in a systematic and effective way. We have been working with CCS over the past two years on the development of this guide and the creation of regional learning centers to help other afterschool programs learn how to implement these practices. We believe that this guide can play an important role nationally in fighting the obesity epidemic and would like to work with you to help get the word out.

Afterschool programs represent an environment that can make a difference to children across the state—because state afterschool funding in California focuses on low income schools where at least 50 percent of the students are eligible for free and reduced lunches, and because afterschool programs have more flexibility than found in the regular school day, they provide excellent opportunities for addressing the most at-risk children.

This guide explains six exemplary practices and contains indicator rubrics that can be used by programs to assess how they are doing in each of the six practice areas and to help them focus their attention on the areas they want to improve. The indicators will also help programs measure their improvement over time.

The practices include:

  • establishing the vision;
  • integrating nutrition and physical activity with youth development principles;
  • providing exciting and meaningful learning experiences that integrate nutrition and physical activity into core activities;
  • working closely with the community, families and the school as full partners;
  • improving food security; and developing diversified funding to sustain a quality program over time.

Staff play a key role—and the guide explains just how central it is. The six practices were developed by CCS after initial research, focus group discussions, and consultation with a statewide stakeholders group of nutrition, physical activity, afterschool, education and other experts. Then a learning community of 11 afterschool programs, selected for their strong nutrition and physical activity focus, used the practices. Representatives from these afterschool programs have been meeting together over the past two years to strengthen their programs by learning from each other and other experts in the field. The meetings provided an opportunity to revise and improve the exemplary practices. With their input and the feedback from the statewide stakeholders group, CCS finalized the guide, which is now posted on its website and can be downloaded in its entirety (www.ccscenter.org). The guide is part of the CCS’ three-year initiative, Healthy Behaviors for Children and Families: Strengthening Afterschool Programs through Exemplary Nutrition, Physical Activity and Food Security Practices, under a contract with the Network for a Healthy California. During 2007-2008, CCS will work with the learning community afterschool programs to develop them into regional learning centers that can provide hands-on help to other afterschool programs.

Development & Implementation of the LAUSD “Soda Ban” and “Junk Food Ban” – PPT

Organization:

University of California, Los Angeles

Web Address:

Click to view, right click to download the PowerPoint

Description:

UCLA Nutrition Colloquium Series: Presented by Stephanie Vecchiarelli, EdD, MPH, School of Public Health, UCLA, on Dec. 1, 2005. Getting low-nutrient foods out of public schools involved a dramatic, cutting-edge policy shift for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Students and staff in two high schools were interviewed 9 months after the junk food bans were implemented to determine the impact on healthy eating in the schools (policy evaluation).

Inventory of Major School Nutrition and Physical Activity Programs and Initiatives

Organization:

University of Washington

Web Address:

http://depts.washington.edu/uwcphn/download/BP_Inventory.pdf

Description:

Center for Public Health Nutrition: Briefing paper developed for a Safe Table Forum – Food and Fitness in Our Schools: Policies, Challenges, and Strategies for Improvement. (November 2003)

Childhood Nutrition and Physical Activity in the Schools: Background Briefing

Organization:

University of Washington

Web Address:

http://depts.washington.edu/uwcphn/download/BP_BackgroundBriefing.pdf

Description:

Center for Public Health Nutrition: Briefing paper developed for a Safe Table Forum – Food and Fitness in Our Schools: Policies, Challenges, and Strategies for Improvement. (November 2003)

School-Based Environmental Intervention – Powerpoint

Organization:

University of California, Los Angeles

Web Address:

http://www.ph.ucla.edu/chs/mchnutrition/Resources/pdf/nfsc%20columbia%207.05.pdf

Description:

UCLA Nutrition Colloquium Series: Presented by Stephanie Vecchiarelli, Project Director for Charlotte Neumann, UCLA School of Public Health on May 5, 2005. Dr. Neumann’s research project conducted with the Los Angeles Unified School District developed 15 steps to promote healthy nutrition and physical activity, using a multilevel school/community intervention model (school-based intervention).

http://www.ph.ucla.edu/chs/mchnutrition/MCH4-Resources-Presentations.html

Is Breastfeeding Protective Against Obesity?

Organization:

University of California, Los Angeles

Web Address:

Description:

UCLA Nutrition Colloquium Series: PowerPoint handout (pdf file) of the slides to accompany the presentation when viewing the video of “Is Breastfeeding Protective Against Obesity?” on-line. Recorded Feb. 3, 2005 by Kay Dewey, PhD Professor of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, at UCLA.

Building Health Communities for Children: The Physical and Social Environments

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.sph.umn.edu/publichealthplanet/events/healthycommunities.html

Description:

VIDEO: Building Health Communities for Children: The Physical and Social Environments A President’s Interdisciplinary Academic Initiative. September 26-27, 2005 Video Presentation and Proceedings available to view and download. This conference examined critical aspects of environments affecting the health and well-being of children, from pre-conception to adolescence. Topics were organized around three broad themes, the natural environment, the built environment and the social environment, and around critical life stages. Special attention is given to the diverse social contexts in which children live, learn, and play. The goals of the conference were to identify new research findings that profile both threats and protective factors in physical and social environments affecting children’s health (including obesity) through various life stages, to describe ways to translate scientific evidence into actions to protect and promote children’s health and to identify research gaps and potential intervention, research and policy collaborations to address these gaps.

Child Obesity Learning Module

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.epi.umn.edu/let

Description:

The Leadership, Education and Training (LET) Program in Maternal and Child Nutrition at the University of Minnesota provides graduate education and training and continuing education programs for Registered Dietitians, nutritionists and other health professionals who are interested in developing a specialization in maternal and child nutrition. The LET Program has contracted with leaders in the field of public health, maternal and child health and maternal and pediatric nutrition to develop web based curricula on maternal and child nutrition related topics. The Child Obesity Learning Module contains the following materials: Background information including a topic overview and literature review for instructors on the learning module topic; Overhead masters or slides prepared using PowerPoint that can be downloaded and reproduced for use in the classroom or clinical setting; Masters for handouts to be used in conjunction with the overheads and slides; Interactive learning strategies such as case studies and role playing activities; Ideas for additional learning activities or for more in-depth training; Sample examination or self-assessment questions.

Food Fight: A Dialogue on Food Industry Litigation and the Obesity Epidemic

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

Click here to open this resource.

Description:

This streaming video resource includes a panel of experts discussing the similarities and differences between the food and tobacco industry including the legal basis for food lawsuits and important factors that determine the likelihood of food industry litigation. Key questions addressed by the panel include:

  • What are the pros and cons of using litigation to achieve public health changes related to food and food marketing practice?
  • What other strategies provide an effective alternative?
  • What would best motivate the food industry to collaborate with public health advocates to develop food marketing strategies that might promote the control of the obesity epidemic?

Speakers/Panelists include: Mary Story, Simone French, David Etzwiler, Michael Ciresi, Skip Humphrey, Joe Price, Peter Goss, and Margo Wootan.

GEMS: Girls Health Enrichment Multi-Site Program

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.epi.umn.edu/cyhp/r_gems2.htm

Slide presentation: www.epi.umn.edu/mch/resources/hg/hgp_obesity_gems.ppt

Description:

This resource outlines the development of an after-school obesity-prevention program for African-American girls and the findings from a 12 week randomized, controlled pilot trial conducted by the University of Minnesota, as part of a multi-site study to test interventions to reduce excessive weight gain in African-American girls.

Overweight Adolescent – Guidelines for Adolescent Nutrition Services

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.epi.umn.edu/let/pubs/adol_book.shtm

Description:

Guidelines for Adolescent Nutrition Services is a comprehensive overview of nutrition issues of teens. Select topics covered in the book include: physical and psychosocial development, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, eating disorders, sports nutrition and children with special health care needs. Chapter 7 focuses on the assessment, treatment and prevention of overweight among adolescents.

Healthy Generations: Child Obesity

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.epi.umn.edu/mch/resources/hg/hg_childobestity.pdf

Description:

Healthy Generations is a newsletter that is produced by the University of Minnesota MCH Training Program. Several issues have been developed in collaboration with the University of Minnesota’s MCH Nutrition Training Program on topics related to obesity assessment, prevention and treatment. A complete listing of Healthy Generations topics can be found at:  http://www.epi.umn.edu/mch/resources/index.shtm

Healthy Generations: Physical Inactivity

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.epi.umn.edu/mch/resources/hg/hg_physicalinactivity.pdf

Description:

Healthy Generations is a newsletter that is produced by the University of Minnesota MCH Training Program. Several issues have been developed in collaboration with the University of Minnesota’s MCH Nutrition Training Program on topics related to obesity assessment, prevention and treatment. A complete listing of Healthy Generations topics can be found at:  http://www.epi.umn.edu/mch/resources/index.shtm

Learning Module on Nutrition-Related Health Disparities

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

http://www.epi.umn.edu/let/nutri/disparities/

Description:

The LET Program has developed web based curricula on maternal and child nutrition related topics. The Nutrition-Related Health Disparities module contains the following materials: Background information including an overview and literature review for instructors on obesity-related risk factors such as physical activity, obesity and dietary intake by race/ethnicity; Overhead masters or slides prepared using PowerPoint that can be downloaded and reproduced for use in the classroom or clinical setting.

Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Among Youth of Color

Organization:

University of Minnesota

Web Address:

Click here to view this resource.

Description:

This presentation focuses on the development of effective prevention strategies to promote healthy eating and physical activity behaviors among low-income youth and communities of color.

Roundtable Series

Organization:

University of Minnesota School of Public Health

Web Address:

http://www.sph.umn.edu/publichealthplanet/events/roundtable/Past_Roundtables.html

Description:

June 2, 2005 Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Among Youth of Color: Engaging Communities Through Multi-Level Strategies March 8, 2005 Food Safety, Protection, and Defense. What Best Serves the Public Good? and Who Determines Acceptable Risk? September 14, 2004 Food Fight: A Dialogue on Food Industry Litigation and the Obesity Epidemic.

WATCH – Cancer Intervention through Churches

Organization:

University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill

Web Address:

http://www.watchproject.net

Description:

WATCH (Wellness for African Americans Through Churches) is a church-based research program in North Carolina designed to prevent and detect colorectal cancer early. The program is aimed at improving nutrition, physical activity, and regular colorectal cancer screening among African American church members. The WATCH website offers videos on proper nutrition and physical activity, with specific strategies to prevent colorectal cancer. The website also offers manuals to offer guidance and instruction for lay health advisors. The videos offered include: Screening for Health! Screening for Life!, Exercise for Health! Exercise for Fitness!, Eat Five a Day…It’s Easier than You Think, Trim the Fat! Cut the Risk!, and The Role of Lay Health Advisors. The manuals offered are: The Lay Health Advisor Manual and The Facilitator’s Training Guide. There is a modest charge for the videos and manuals.

 

 

 

 

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